Plastic Surgery Research Council

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Psychosocial Dysfunction of Children with Craniofacial Anomalies and Monolingual Spanish Parents in Los Angeles
Miles J. Pfaff, MD1, Julia R. Ayeroff, BA1, Elizabeth J. Volpicelli, BA1, David S. Foulad, MD1, James P. Bradley, MD2, Libby Wilson, MD3, Justine C. Lee, MD, PhD1.
1Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Temple University Hopsital, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 3Orthopaedic Institute for Children, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

PURPOSE: The sizeable non-English speaking immigrant population in Los Angeles County allows for a unique opportunity to evaluate the effect of language and the immigrant experience on psychosocial functioning in children with craniofacial anomalies. The current multi-institutional study focuses on the influence of parental primary language on psychosocial functioning in children with craniofacial anomalies.
METHODS: 160 children (age 8-17 years) with craniofacial anomalies from UCLA and the Orthopaedic Institute for Children of Los Angeles were prospectively administered the NIH's Parent Proxy-Reported and Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) assessments for anger, anxiety, depression, and peer relationships. To correct for economic disparities, patients on public insurance were selected (n=117). Children with monolingual Spanish-speaking caregivers (MSC; n=37) and English-speaking caregivers (ESC; n=80) were compared with an independent samples t-test. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant.
RESULTS: No statistically significant differences in age, gender, or diagnoses were found between patients of MSC compared to ESC. The children of MSC self-reported more anger (49.37.66 vs. 44.49.21), anxiety (51.910.2 vs. 46.510.3), depression (50.79.84 vs. 44.79.51), and worse peer relationships (44.67.90 vs. 50.08.92; p<0.01 all measures) than children of ESC. MSC rated their children as having significantly more anger (49.911.3 vs. 44.710.7), anxiety (53.29.36 vs. 48.99.58), and depression (51.47.57 vs. 47.68.86; p<0.05 all measures) than the ESC group.
CONCLUSION: Psychosocial functioning of children with craniofacial anomalies and MSC was more negative as assessed by children for all four measures and in three out of four measures as assessed by their parents.


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