Plastic Surgery Research Council

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Pre-operative Educational Video In Breast Reconstruction: Impact On Patient Satisfaction And Post-operative Pain Experience
Kasandra R. Dassoulas, MD, Jessica Feliz, B.S., Alice Chae, B.S., Jonathan B. Olenczak, M.D., Alessandrina M. Freitas, M.D., Rhett Willis, M.D., Chris A. Campbell, M.D., FACS.
University of VIrginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Purpose: Patient satisfaction and education is increasingly important in plastic surgery. We aimed to investigate the impact of an educational video preoperatively viewed by breast reconstruction patients in terms of comprehension, satisfaction with medical information, and the post-operative pain experience.
Methods: A Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the pre-operative reconstruction module of the BREAST-Q were completed upon arrival to clinic. Patients were randomized to a control group receiving the ASPS breast reconstruction pamphlet or to view an educational video. This was followed by consultation with the surgeon, after which patients completed a comprehension questionnaire, the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS), and the post-operative reconstruction module of the BREAST-Q. Post-operative pain scores and opioid requirements were recorded.
Results: Thirty-six patients were recruited for the study, 18 in each arm. Baseline anxiety and depression rates were equivalent between the two groups. Patients in the educational video arm scored significantly higher on the comprehension questions than the control group (86.7% correct vs 78.5% correct, p=0.039). Subjective measures of satisfaction with information, however, were greater in the control group. Post-operative experience with pain was similar between the two groups and better pain control most significantly correlated with stronger pre-operative psychosocial well-being.
Conclusions: We sought to improve patient education and satisfaction by introducing an educational video. While employment of an educational video objectively improves patient education, it may not translate to a subjective improvement in satisfaction. The post-operative pain experience is complex and subject to immutable factors including pre-operative psychosocial well-being.


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